Skip to content

Quiche three ways

April 17, 2017

Making quiche is a lot easier than I imagined it might be.

Every Easter my wife’s mother has the family over for brunch. Usually she makes quiche, among many other things, and we’ll bring something else (Teresa always makes cheesy hash browns using my grandmother’s recipe, which is something else I should blog sometime).

This year the quiche-making fell to us. I’d never done this before, but as I suggested it’s surprisingly easy (particularly if, like me, you have a pastry chef on hand to handle the crusts).

Quiche 03

Basically, if the crusts are taken care of (you can use store-bought, and a crustless quiche is even easier than traditional), it comes down to three simple steps:

  1. Prep your ingredients ahead of time (roast the broccoli, fry the bacon, sauté the mushrooms etc). I did this the night before and put everything in the fridge, it made Easter morning even simpler.
  2. Fill your pie shells / baking dish about 3/4 full with a mix of fillings.
  3. Pour in the egg mixture, and bake.

I’ll provide some more specifics, but more as a game plan than a traditional recipe. First, I’ll separate the various fillings by prep method:

Sautéed/fried (generally in olive oil, or use the bacon fat if you prefer, seasoning with salt & pepper as you go): bacon, leek, mushroom, spinach.

Roasted (in a 400° oven, brushed with olive oil, seasoned with salt & pepper): broccoli until it’s begun to crisp, asparagus until it’s just cooked (soft on the inside).

Steamed: a pound-and-a-half of mussels, as per these directions, then shelled.

No prep other than chopping / grating: smoked salmon, goat cheese, Gruyère, gorgonzola, dill, tarragon, thyme, chives, sage, prosciutto, a Bosc pear (just for fun).

IMG_5388Each quiche is going to require about eight eggs, depending on the size of your baking dish. Whisked together with each batch of those I added about one cup of 18% cream. I used less cream in the crustless quiche to try to make it firmer, but I don’t think I needed to worry. Be sure to season the egg mixture with salt and pepper.

If you’re using an unbaked crust, you need to let it set by cooking it for about 15 minutes in a 350° oven. On the advice of recipes like this one, I covered each shell with parchment for the first ten minutes of baking, and filled it with dried beans to keep the crust from changing shape.

After the crust has set, let it cool, then fill it roughly three-quarters-full (probably more) with your selection of filling. I was worried I might have over-filled mine, but that was not a problem. (The whole process seems very forgiving of any imprecision, or else I was just really lucky.)

Pour over your egg mixture until it’s approaching the top of the crust, then bake at 350° for about 40 minutes, until the eggs in the middle have set. You can check them with a toothpick, like checking a cake. If it comes out clean and dry, they’re done. For me, when they looked done on the top, they were done on the inside too.

To make a crustless quiche just skip the crust. Be sure to spray the baking dish with cooking spray or brush it with oil.

IMG_5383

You can have all kinds of fun deciding what goes in each quiche. This would be a great way to use leftovers. As best as I can recall, I think I made these three:

Mussel & Smoked Salmon Quiche (crustless): mussels, smoked salmon, leek, dill, tarragon, goat cheese, asparagus.

Broccoli & Mushroom Quiche: Broccoli, mushroom, Gruyère cheese, spinach, thyme, sage, chives.

Bacon, Blue Cheese & Bosc Pear: Bacon, prosciutto, asparagus, leek, gorgonzola, Gruyère, thyme, chives, Bosc pear.

I’ll try a lobster quiche when the season opens (just a couple more weeks now).

Quiche 04

 

Advertisements
Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: